Breeding Frequently Asked Questions And Comments


The decision to breed your cat is a big decision and should not be taken lightly. We find ourselves responding to the same questions and comments over and over again. Please take the time to read the whole page if you are considering breeding. My information is a bit scattered, so read even the questions you don't feel apply to you.

I'm an experienced dog breeder, so I know what I'm doing.
Can you provide stud services if I buy a female?
Where can I find a stud cat?
Okay, I'll buy a stud cat.
Stud Pants? Tell me more!
Are unaltered males aggressive?

I'm an experienced dog breeder, so I know what I'm doing.

Sadly, this is a very common one. Puppies are a lot of hard work. They require 8 weeks of constant clean up and a rather large amount of space depending on the breed. If your thinking your going to swap out the puppy box for a litter box and have sweet little fluff balls instead of out of control toddlers with fur and no diapers, it's just not that simple... I agree that this 8 week period of time is much easier done with kittens. It still requires a great deal of patience and kitty proofing your house, because there are very few ways of containing an 8 week old kitten. Kittens are naturally litter trained, so the cleanup is a breeze compared to puppies, although it still has to be done just as often.

So where does this hard part come in? As a dog breeder these 8 weeks are the hardest out of the entire process. As a cat breeder it's the rest of the time that is difficult. The constant work and cleanup happens on every day, of every week, of every year. Pregnancy is the easiest time for a cat breeder. This is because of the constant vigilance needed to own a stud cat. Keep reading for information about this.

Can you provide stud services if I buy a female?

I have to say this one worries me the most. It makes me immediately aware that the questioner has not done their research. Whether that is the research of breeding in general or of our cats, I'm often not sure. All of our cat's are related. We only keep one male and he is the father of all of our kittens.

Where can I find a stud cat?

The simple answer is: You buy one. Very few breeders out there will provide stud services. If you find one, BEWARE you are putting your cat at great risk. The spread of disease among cats is a force to be reckoned with. Feline Leukemia can kill your breeding cat and every other cat you have in your home. The disease is slow to show up on a test, so there is no safe way of testing before and after a breeding. The only way to be sure that your cats are, and will remain disease free, is to close off your home to all outside kitties. Yes, all your cats will have to be indoor only, you can't take in strays, or watch your neighbors kitty for vacation.

Okay, I'll buy a stud cat.

Sounds easy enough. Most cat owners have more than one anyway right? Well... There's more than just two kitties to love. Female cats cycle about every 10 days and their heat can last anywhere from a few days to a week. This means if they are not already pregnant, they are almost always susceptible. Pregnancy prevention can easily take over your existence. I won't even entertain the idea of caging a male cat as an option and living with an unaltered male is not an easy thing to do. Male cat's instinctively mark their territory. There is NO WAY around this. There were no good options out there when we started breeding, but I was determined and got creative. We use stud pants on our male. It is the only way that we can prevent the inevitable destruction a male cat would have on our home and belongings. They also serve the purpose of kitty contraception. It is still not an easy option. Rio requires constant changing of his pad, bathing, and extra grooming because of this. An outdoor trash can is a must for disposing of his soiled items or your home will still smell like cat urine. The spray from an unfixed male is much stronger than that of a female or even a neutered male.

Stud Pants? Tell me more!

I designed our Stud Pants to be a long term solution for territorial marking and pregnancy prevention. They are meant to be worn all day, not just for brief periods. There are other varieties out there in more of a diaper style, but they are bulky and also contain fecal waste making them an option for short outings, but not everyday, all day wear. Our stud pants are designed to be worn with a bladder protection pad and contain urine only, leaving your kitty with the ability to use the litter box for the rest of their messy business. I put a lot of time into researching feline urine output and how much a bladder pad can hold. The pads need to be cut in half to fit in the pants, but one half pad can more than handle an entire days worth of kitty urine output. Our pants only cover what needs to be covered. We don't offer suspenders or fashion overall styles because they're not needed. Our pants stay on as-is and we don't need to accessorize ours to make them function. They are about the same size as a mesh harness and stay on just as effectively. It may take your kitty a while to get used to wearing them, but once they do it's just like wearing a collar or harness. We don't recommend 24 hour a day use. They should be removed for grooming and changing of the pad every day. Rio wears his about 15 hours a day and sleeps in the bathroom at night. This gives me time to groom him and change the pad, but also allows time for him to groom himself. Theoretically they can be used on female cats for urine containment, but I've never had the need to try. Because of the difference in anatomy, I don't think they would be as effective for pregnancy prevention worn by a female with a determined naked male around.

Are unaltered males aggressive?

Although I wouldn't describe Rio as aggressive, he is more aggressive in nature than our females. Whether this is just a male to female comparison I am not sure. Many breeders describe their stud cats as aggressive, but this may be simply the result of confining their animal to a cage, or possibly their own hostility towards him because of destruction of their home. Neutered males have always been my greatest recommendation as pets. Males tend to accept more people who enter your home, while females are more family oriented. I guess my final answer would have to be neutering your male will lessen any aggressiveness that may be there inherently, but I don't believe leaving a male cat in his natural state increases their aggression (Although, it may increase yours).

Still have questions? Contact Us and ask anything.